Samosa Puffs

Every Indian household is sure to have samosas for any occasion.  Whether we were visiting relatives or friends, at a wedding, holidays, celebrations of any kind…. well, you get the point!  Samosas everywhere.  When I went off to college, my mom used to make dozens and dozens and put them in large zip top bags that I would freeze and microwave them as I was in the mood for them.

My roommates and friends at college also benefited.  There were many nights sitting in our common room studying over samosas, sharing heartbreaks or girl talk or just hanging out.

These samosa puffs are a fun twist to the traditional samosas that are usually filled in a cone made of freshly  kneaded dough.  The girls had fun with the flaky pastry and loved that I kept the filling with the traditional potatoes and peas that they are used to.

From my kitchen to yours, I hope you enjoy these delicious Samosa Puffs!

Chocolate Samosa

Rakhi is here and I wanted to make it special for the girls’ cousin Krish.  Traditionally, a sister ties a Rakhi (similar to a friendship bracelet) on their brother’s hand and feed them their favorite sweet.  In return, the brother gives his sister a gift as a token of love and both promise to honor and protect each other.
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It’s a really great festival to celebrate siblings and I wanted Krish to feel special.  So I asked his mom what his favorite desserts are and she said anything with chocolate (my kind of kid!).  I set my brain to work and really thought about different desserts I could make for him.

When I first thought of this fusion recipe, I was excited, nervous, and skeptical of how it would turn out.  As I started making it though, I saw this was going to be one of my best creations yet!
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What is a Chocolate Samosa?
A chocolate samosa is a delicious fusion of sweet chocolate (and your favorite add-ins) with a crust of a samosa.  Traditionally, a samosa is a savory snack made of a roti dough crust and filled with a potato pea mixture which is deep fried.

I took the concept of a samosa, and gave it a pie crust filled with Nutella.  Let me just say, I felt like complete bliss eating this delicious dessert!

To make these beauties, I made my pie crust and kept the dough in the fridge for an hour to keep it cool.  When making pie dough, you have to use cold butter and ice water but if the dough starts getting to room temperature, it can get sticky and hard to handle.

Once I pulled it out of the fridge, I divided it into 13 portions, rolled them out and cut them in half to make the samosa cones.  Fill them about 3/4 of the way with Nutella then seal the seam.  Freeze these for an hour (you can even keep them in the freezer up to 3 month) then when you’re ready, bake them for 15 minutes!
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Add-Ins
I did straight up Nutella for this one but who’s to say you can’t make other creations?  Here are a few ideas:

  • Coconut
  • Toffee
  • Almonds and sea salt
  • Pistachios
  • Cashews
  • White chocolate and hazelnut

Try it out and enjoy this delicious creation for Rakhi, Diwali, or any day you’re in the mood for some samosas and chocolate!

From my kitchen to yours, hope you fall in love with these Chocolate Samosas like I did!

Baingan Bharta (Punjabi Eggplant)

If you’ve been reading my blog, you know that growing up I was not an eggplant fan.  So why am I posting 2 recipes (Baba Ghanouj and this one) with eggplant within a month?  They became a part of my adult life and I learned what I was missing out on.
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I’m not sure about the timeline but I do remember maybe a few months after I got married, we had gone down to see my in-laws for the weekend.  Mom had made baingan bharta and I was trying to be nice so I ate it without telling her I was not a big fan of eggplant.  It was ingrained in me since I was a kid that you ate what you got, especially at someone else’s house without a fuss.  Man am I thankful for that specific rule!
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Though I took maybe only about a tablespoon’s worth (and spread it out so my MIL wouldn’t notice – yep…. totally resorting to childhood antics), baingan bharta became a new favorite of mine.  Since then, I have tried it at various restaurants and at home but nothing compares to the way my MIL makes it.  This recipe is hers and I’m excited to share it.
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Notes:
Try to pick eggplants with fewer seeds as this will give you more flesh and will be less bitter.  Male eggplants tend to have fewer seeds and to tell the difference, at the bottom of the eggplant, there will be an indentation.  If it is deep and shaped like a dash, the eggplant is female, if it is shallow and round, it is a male.
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If you do end up with an eggplant with more seeds, after roasting the eggplant, don’t skin it right away.  Let the eggplants sit on a tray and continue steaming to soften the seeds.
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You can store the roasted eggplant in the fridge for up to 3 days or in the freezer for up to 1 month.

From my Mother-in-Law’s kitchen to yours, we hope you enjoy this one!

Bhinda Bataka nu Shaak / Okra Potato Sabzi

Growing up, my mom would make traditional Gujarati food for dinner most days.  My brother and I loved eating a Gujarati thaali (not all the time) and one of my favorites was Bhinda Bataka nu Shaak.  The crunchy exterior of the potato that’s just soft enough to melt on the inside and the crispy okra to finish off the dish is just the perfect reminder of home to me.
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Yum

When I made this dish, I was so excited to share my love for it with kids.  I’ll be honest though, they didn’t take to the okra which broke my heart.  Sort of.  They ate the potatoes though.  But I’m going to keep trying to share my love of okra and hope one day they do like it as much as I do.
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But okra is so slimy!

Trust me, I know!  So my hack…. use frozen or pre-cut okra.  And fresh squeezed lemon juice.  Wait, what?  Yep, lemon juice helps break down the slime without turning your veggies into mush.
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Want to know something even more cool?  The “slime” (known as mucilage) actually contains soluble fiber.  Here are a few more benefits of eating okra:

  • High in antioxidants such as beta-carotene, xanthin, and lutein
  • Good source of Folate
  • Good source of Vit. C, Vit. A, and Vit. K
  • Good source of Non-Dairy Calcium, Iron, Manganese, and Magnesium

So try this delicious sabzi for your next Gujarati thaali.  It’s delicious and healthy and so easy to make.  Try it out!
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From my kitchen to yours, I hope this dish brings you the joy it brings me.